Using Forests for Water Treatment: An Example from Rio de Janeiro

By |2019-03-21T10:01:21+01:00March 21st 2019|basic infrastructure & housing, water & sanitation, Tags: , , , |

Ecosystem loss and degradation contributes to water insecurity worldwide – natural infrastructure strategies that protect and restore natural systems aim to halt and reverse this trend. Suzanne Ozment and Rafael Feltran-Barbieri discuss how water utilities can profit from restoring ecosystems.

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What Hides Behind the Concept of Digital Water?

By |2019-03-19T11:18:50+01:00March 19th 2019|basic infrastructure & housing, water & sanitation, Tags: , , |

How can digitalisation of urban services increase sustainable urbanisation? What different approaches and innovations already exist and have proven successful? Kala Vairavamoorthy, director of the International Water Association addresses these questions.

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Promoting Innovative Financing Solutions for Cities

By |2019-03-14T13:36:29+01:00March 14th 2019|climate change & resilience, governance & finance, municipal & climate finance, Tags: , , , |

About 75 per cent of the infrastructure that needs to be in place by 2050 does not exist today. Getting such an immense scale of infrastructure development right will be critical to whether or not the world locks into a high- or low-carbon growth path. The newly established City Finance Lab tries to contribute innovative, replicable and scalable solutions to reach this ambitious goal.

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A Place Like Too Many Others: Gender Inequality in Bawana, Delhi

By |2019-03-08T09:17:30+01:00March 8th 2019|basic infrastructure & housing, water & sanitation, Tags: , , , , , , |

In urban settlements around the world, city administrations struggle, and often fail, to provide essential services, safe spaces, and socio-economic securities to residents. While this poses difficulties and dangers to all inhabitants, the consequences of such neglect are especially severe for low-income women and girls.

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Escalating to Peace: How a Simple Investment Helped Change the Face of Colombia’s Most Dangerous Neighbourhood

By |2019-03-06T09:48:18+01:00March 6th 2019|urban & metropolitan governance, Tags: , , , |

Comuna 13, also known as San Javier, used to be the most dangerous part of Medellín, cut off from the rest of the city and a place to avoid by all means. An ambitious infrastructure project has changed that, turning the district in a tourist destination.

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The (Un)walkable City: The Pedestrian Crisis in Kyiv

By |2019-03-05T10:58:12+01:00March 5th 2019|urban mobility, Tags: , , , , |

Street design in Kyiv, Ukraine leaves something to be desired: walkability. Oleksandr Anisimov analyses how it needs to change so that everyone can use public space.

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Can Urban Planning Serve Local Economic Development?

By |2019-01-24T13:54:12+01:00January 15th 2019|economic development, Tags: , , , , , |

In Kampala, Uganda, the immensely fast rate of urbanisation makes it hard for urban planners to keep up with developments. Madina Guloba argues that this makes it more important than ever for sustainable urban planning to keep local economic development (LED) approaches in mind.

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Green Infrastructure in Mexico: A Booster for Healthier Cities

By |2018-10-18T10:47:43+01:00October 17th 2018|green & smart development, health & education, Uncategorized, urban mobility, Tags: , , , , |

Citizens of Mexico City face serious health issues – due to failures in urban planning, says Auribel Villa. Green infrastructure development significantly supports cities' ways towards becoming healthier and thus more liveable.

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The Lagos Water Crisis: Any Role for the Private Sector?

By |2018-08-28T11:35:39+01:00August 28th 2018|basic infrastructure & housing, governance & finance, urban & metropolitan governance, water & sanitation, Tags: , , , , , |

Lagos is suffering from severe water shortage due to profit-oriented politics. Akinbode Oluwafemi points out the conflicts and problems around the privatisation of the water sector and offers alternative solutions for one of the world’s most populous cities.

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Let’s talk about Urban Governance − Abidjan, Ivory Coast

By |2018-07-12T15:24:25+01:00July 2nd 2018|governance & finance, urban & metropolitan governance, Tags: , , , , , , |

There has been consent in international debates that implementing the SDGs requires approaching them from a local perspective. In this very personal account, Alexis Gueu talks about the challenges the city of Abidjan, Ivory Coast is facing – and the urgent need for the municipality to develop urban governance structures to tackle these problems.

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“Being a smart city means making smart decisions” – interview with Mario Arauz from the city of Guadalajara

By |2018-03-28T11:12:56+01:00March 28th 2018|smart & digital development, Tags: , , , , |

Known as a technology hub, Guadalajara is Mexico’s answer to Silicon Valley. No wonder then that the city is in the process of transforming itself into a smart city. URBANET talked to Mario Arauz, Director of Government Innovation and Intelligent Cities, about Guadalajara’s take on the smart city concept.

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Mitigation Through Innovation: Sustainable Water Supply in Windhoek

By |2018-03-22T10:21:51+01:00March 22nd 2018|urban nexus, water & sanitation, Tags: , , , , |

Windhoek—the capital city of Namibia, the most arid country in Sub-Saharan Africa—has long met its severe water challenges through innovation. But its growing population is increasing its demand for water while climate change exacerbates scarce supplies. On the occation of World Water Day 2018, Pierre van Rensburg highlights the city's innovative augmentation strategies to keep the crisis from becoming a catastrophe.

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Managing Water in Secondary Cities: Interview with Mathew Kurian

By |2018-03-20T11:12:56+01:00March 16th 2018|basic infrastructure & housing, water & sanitation, Tags: , , , |

As World Water Day approaches, URBANET interviewed Mathew Kurian of UN University about managing water supplies in secondary cities. Although often overshadowed by megacities, secondary cities face slightly different—but just as significant—water challenges as their larger neighbours. Kurian argues that secondary cities could be important laboratories for innovative financing mechanisms, but that we must first disrupt the entrenched dis-incentives that promote business as usual.

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After COP23, it is now up to local and national leaders to act on their promises

By |2017-12-14T15:17:12+01:00November 22nd 2017|climate change & resilience, global urban debates, Tags: , , , , , , , , |

With COP23 now over, it is again up to nation states and local governments to act and implement their agreements. Wrapping up the reporting on the conference, Lou del Bello looks at coordinating climate action, and necessary changes in infrastructure and urban policy.

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“In terms of speed, there is no one-size-fits-all solution” – Interview with Carlos Pardo from Despacio

By |2017-10-14T15:18:27+01:00April 25th 2017|basic infrastructure & housing, urban mobility, Tags: , , , , , , , |

In his interview with URBANET, Carlos Pardo talks about urban roads shared equally by cyclists, pedestrians and drivers, that we can save money by slowing down traffic and how we can convince people to act more environmentally friendly.

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