URBANET FOCUS WEEKS: URBAN DEVELOPMENT IN JORDAN
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Jordan’s Swelling Cities: No More Time for Procrastination!

By |May 12th 2021|Categories: Climate Change & Resilience, Urban & Metropolitan Governance|Tags: , , |

Challenges to residents, resources, and the environment alike: Mohammad Asfour shares his observations on Jordan's rapid urbanisation.

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Mobilising Intersectional Climate Action: Lessons from Barcelona

By |May 11th 2021|Categories: Climate Change & Resilience, Youth & Gender|Tags: , , , |

There is growing urgency for cities to take integrated climate action that can address inequalities more holistically. Barcelona is leading the way by applying intersectional thinking to urban planning. By Ana T. Amorim-Maia

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Infographics: Urbanisation and Urban Development in Jordan

By |May 6th 2021|Categories: Global Urban Debates|Tags: , , , , |

URBANET's latest country series focuses on Jordan, and as always, we start the series with a collection of infographics! Learn more about urban development in a country where urbanisation has been a powerful factor for more than 30 years.

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Cities Are Still Not Doing Enough to Reduce Air Pollution

By |May 4th 2021|Categories: Urban & Metropolitan Governance, Urban Health|Tags: , |

Despite scientific evidence of the relation between air pollution and premature deaths, cities are hesitant to take bold action for clean air. Mark Nieuwenhuijsen and Sasha Khomenko on reasons and perspectives.

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Spatial Fragmentation in Nairobi City; the Elephant in the Room

By |April 29th 2021|Categories: Urban & Metropolitan Governance|Tags: , , , |

Nairobi is recognised to be among the rapidly urbanising and growing economies in East and Central Africa. Eunice Jimmy reviews the city's spatial, economic, and social structure, uncovering its dual nature of formal/informal, planned/unplanned, and connected/disconnected fragments, hence Nairobi's spatial fragmentation.

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Sparking Transformation Towards Inclusive Cities in a Post-Pandemic World

By |April 27th 2021|Categories: Economic Development, Smart & Digital Development|Tags: , , |

The global pandemic presents us with many challenges. But the current digital transformation may also be a powerful tool for inclusive city planning. Ramola Naik Singru from the Asian Development Bank highlights key learnings.

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Equal Access for All in Amman, Jordan

By |April 22nd 2021|Categories: Decent Work, Urban Health|Tags: , , |

Amman's infrastructure is not accessible to everyone. This has far-reaching consequences for people with disabilities – their everyday lives, their education, and their employment. Asia Yaghi analyses challenges and options.

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Rethinking “Fortress Europe”: Public Spaces from Idomeni to Thessaloniki, Greece

By |April 20th 2021|Categories: Global Urban Debates, Urban & Metropolitan Governance|Tags: , , , , |

After years of ongoing crisis, the once called temporary measures at the EU borders have become constant ones: the Fortress Europe has solidified. Isabell Enssle presents the effects the fortified border has for communities and public spaces from the North Macedonian-Greek borderline to the city of Thessaloniki, linking them with a tool kit for inclusive public spaces.

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Right to the City: Informal Workers and Public Space in Mexico City

By |April 15th 2021|Categories: Decent Work|Tags: , , , |

The informal economy contributes significantly to the wealth of many cities worldwide, but local legislators rarely recognise the rights of informal workers to use public space. Tania Espinosa Sánchez from WIEGO shares critical insights from Ciudad de México.

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