Fostering Multilevel Governance: The Cities and Regions Talanoa Dialogues

By |2018-09-25T10:34:17+00:00September 25th 2018|global urban debates, urban & metropolitan governance, Tags: , , , , , |

The Cities and Regions Talanoa Dialogues are a highly efficient tool towards achieving the goals set in the Paris Agreement. This can be seen in examples from Togo, the Philippines, Indonesia, South Africa, and Ecuador, writes Jisun Hwang from the ICLEI.

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Policy Reform, not Evictions! The Case of Slum Urbanisation in Khartoum, Sudan

By |2018-09-20T10:51:39+00:00September 20th 2018|housing & informality, urban & metropolitan governance, Tags: , , , , |

A radical reform of Khartoum’s housing policy is required to improve the living conditions of slum dwellers. For this, we need to examine the socio-economic situation of the urban poor and of those who live in the city’s informal settlements.

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The Lagos Water Crisis: Any Role for the Private Sector?

By |2018-08-28T11:35:39+00:00August 28th 2018|basic infrastructure & housing, governance & finance, urban & metropolitan governance, water & sanitation, Tags: , , , , , |

Lagos is suffering from severe water shortage due to profit-oriented politics. Akinbode Oluwafemi points out the conflicts and problems around the privatisation of the water sector and offers alternative solutions for one of the world’s most populous cities.

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The Urban Spring of May 1st

By |2018-05-03T14:07:37+00:00May 3rd 2018|decent work, economic development, Tags: , , , , |

Cities throughout the world face the challenge of how to create more – and decent – jobs. On Labour Day, Edmundo Werna makes the case for an extensive urban dialogue as a necessary condition for a proactive employment policy.

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“Being a smart city means making smart decisions” – interview with Mario Arauz from the city of Guadalajara

By |2018-03-28T11:12:56+00:00March 28th 2018|smart & digital development, Tags: , , , , |

Known as a technology hub, Guadalajara is Mexico’s answer to Silicon Valley. No wonder then that the city is in the process of transforming itself into a smart city. URBANET talked to Mario Arauz, Director of Government Innovation and Intelligent Cities, about Guadalajara’s take on the smart city concept.

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Mitigation Through Innovation: Sustainable Water Supply in Windhoek

By |2018-03-22T10:21:51+00:00March 22nd 2018|urban nexus, water & sanitation, Tags: , , , , |

Windhoek—the capital city of Namibia, the most arid country in Sub-Saharan Africa—has long met its severe water challenges through innovation. But its growing population is increasing its demand for water while climate change exacerbates scarce supplies. On the occation of World Water Day 2018, Pierre van Rensburg highlights the city's innovative augmentation strategies to keep the crisis from becoming a catastrophe.

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Making Africa’s green cities core of the low carbon and climate resilient future

By |2018-08-02T11:58:48+00:00November 22nd 2017|economic development, green & smart development, Tags: , , , , , , |

How Africa as a continent makes cities work for all while realising a low carbon and climate resilient economy, will determine the success of the Paris Agreement, says Sadiq Okoh. In his article, he outlines possible paths to green development.

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Carbon Credits: cleaner and safer cooking stoves in the Maputo slums

By |2017-10-14T14:57:24+00:00September 20th 2017|basic infrastructure & housing, energy & waste, Tags: , , , , , , |

Traditional cooking stoves consume a lot of energy and emit harmful fumes, leading to high rates of premature deaths. Improved cooking stoves are addressing this issue, making it possible for poor households to save money and reduce illnesses related to emissions. Looking at the example of Maputo, Mozambique Rosario Loayza and Alessandro Galimberti explain the benefits of such efficient kitchen appliances.

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Upscaling Sanitation for the Urban Poor in Kenya

By |2017-10-14T15:02:14+00:00August 29th 2017|basic infrastructure & housing, water & sanitation, Tags: , , , , , , |

Providing access to urban sanitation is challenging because of space limitations, complex land tenure and higher public health concerns in crowded settlements. This is especially true for low-income urban areas. For URBANET, Jane Njagi describes how this challenge has been tackled in Tharaka Nithi County, Kenya.

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Disorder in Public Transportation in Major Cities of Sub-Saharan Africa: The case of Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire

By |2017-10-14T15:03:14+00:00August 22nd 2017|basic infrastructure & housing, urban mobility, Tags: , , , , |

Like most major cities in Sub-Saharan Africa, Abidjan has a traffic problem: Congestion, pollution and extortion amongst public transport providers means that the basic service of mobility can only be provided to citizens on a limited scale. Alexis Gueu analyses the situation.

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How M-Pesa is changing everyday life in Kenya

By |2017-10-14T15:05:49+00:00July 31st 2017|green & smart development, smart & digital development, Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Mobile money has revolutionised the lives of many people in the Global South, most of all the ones living in difficult economic circumstances. The M-Pesa service in Kenya is one of these success stories. Judith Owigar describes how it helps making basic services like water and energy available to citizens.

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Cities should be built for people – Let us start with creating safe public spaces for everyone

By |2017-10-14T15:09:03+00:00June 30th 2017|basic infrastructure & housing, public spaces, Tags: , , , , , , , , |

In South Africa, historical shortcomings in city planning by the apartheid regime, rapid urbanisation, and a lack of economic opportunities have increased inequity and social exclusion. Faced with high rates of violence and crime, citizens are getting involved in enhancing safety in public spaces. Margo Weimers and her co-authors present an example from the city of Johannesburg.

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How sustainable mobility can transform Africa’s cities

By |2018-08-02T12:06:44+00:00May 31st 2017|basic infrastructure & housing, urban mobility, Tags: , , , , , , , |

Over the next 15 years, African cities will add 300 million new urban residents—fully two-thirds above today’s urban population. This unprecedented demographic shift presents a tremendous opportunity for economic uplift and poverty reduction, but these benefits hinge on the ability of African cities to dramatically improve the delivery of infrastructure and services to drive future growth.

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Where there’s a will there’s a way: Vertical Partnerships for a Sustainable Future

By |2017-10-14T15:19:05+00:00April 21st 2017|governance & finance, mutli stakeholder partnerships, Tags: , , , , , , |

The international community has come a long way when it comes to sustainable development. The next step is to continue the partnerships that helped create these frameworks and bring them down to the level of implementation.

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Mozambique’s Stand-by Generation

By |2017-10-14T15:20:00+00:00April 13th 2017|governance & finance, participation, Tags: , , , , , , , |

In the International Development world, “youth” constitutes a critical variable to look at in any given country. Policy makers believe that more educated generations with better health and economic conditions than their parents are the absolute precondition for achieving long-term economic and social development. They are also aware that a frustrated youth is a serious threat to political stability and economic growth.

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