Rural-Urban Migration and Youth Unemployment in Nigeria: Why Public Programmes Fail

By |2020-06-22T12:43:52+02:00February 6th 2019|Categories: Decent Work, Economic Development, Youth & Gender|Tags: , , , , , |

With many young Nigerians relocating from rural to urban areas, unemployment is on the rise. Charles Ogheneruonah Eghweree and Festus Imuetinyan sketch out possible policy responses.

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Reducing Youth Crime Through Employment? An Example from Papua New Guinea

By |2020-06-22T12:44:01+02:00January 24th 2019|Categories: Economic Development, Youth & Gender|Tags: , , , , , |

Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea has high rates of youth crime – and an employment programme aimed at changing this to the better. How effective are such programmes? Oleksiy Ivaschenko presents the findings of his recent study to URBANET.

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“(Mis-)Educating the Ghettoes of our world” – is there a Collective Neglect of the Role of Education for Youth in Violent Cities Around the World?

By |2021-02-23T14:48:26+01:00July 26th 2017|Categories: Basic Infrastructure & Housing, Urban Health, Youth & Gender|Tags: , , , , , , |

The world’s population is becoming younger, and the majority of people under the age of 25 are living in the rapidly growing cities of Latin America, Africa, and Asia. Reports claim that a disproportionate proportion of youth live in impoverished, unplanned, and often highly violent urban settlements where they are more likely to be both victims and perpetrators of urban violence. What education strategies are needed in order to improve their situation?

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Cities should be built for people – Let us start with creating safe public spaces for everyone

By |2021-02-22T13:37:01+01:00June 30th 2017|Categories: Basic Infrastructure & Housing, Youth & Gender|Tags: , , , , , , , |

In South Africa, historical shortcomings in city planning by the apartheid regime, rapid urbanisation, and a lack of economic opportunities have increased inequity and social exclusion. Faced with high rates of violence and crime, citizens are getting involved in enhancing safety in public spaces. Margo Weimers and her co-authors present an example from the city of Johannesburg.

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