Water & Sanitation

Making Water and Sanitation Work for the Poor in Kenya

By |2020-06-22T12:37:27+02:00June 16th 2020|Multi Stakeholder Partnerships, Urban Health, Water & Sanitation, , , , |

A well-functioning system for water and sanitation must address the needs of under-served urban residents. Eden Mati-Mwangi shows how a systems-change approach can have a lasting impact on Kenya’s sanitations sector.

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Energy and Resources from Wastewater: A Triple-Win Solution for Cities in China and India

By |2020-04-30T10:37:44+02:00April 30th 2020|Water & Sanitation, , , , |

Drawing on examples from China and India, Betsy Otto, Xiaotian Fu, and Sahana Goswami from the World Resource Institute present the benefits of circular economy approaches in urban wastewater treatment.

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Landscape Porosity: Why we need Water-Based Urbanism

By |2020-05-14T08:53:35+02:00April 28th 2020|Climate Change & Resilience, Water & Sanitation, , , , , |

Creating urban spaces that allow for the free flow and penetration of water and wind is essential to the survival of water-based cities like Bangkok. “Landscape porosity” can help us better understand and defend these urban ecosystems in times of climate change, says Kotchakorn Voraakhom.

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Circular Economies – Benefits for an Urban Setting

By |2020-04-09T13:16:41+02:00April 9th 2020|Energy & Waste, Water & Sanitation, , , , , , |

The waste produced by cities does not need to be dumped – but instead can become the starting point of a new production cycle, argues Nick Jeffries from the Ellen MacArthur Foundation.

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Cooperatively Recovering Water as an Urban Common

By |2020-04-07T07:56:09+02:00April 7th 2020|Global Urban Debates, Urban & Metropolitan Governance, Water & Sanitation, , , |

Water as a common resource that no one should derive profit from – an idea that stands in crass contrast to privatising urban water management. Kostas Nikolaou, professor and activist with the Greek water movement K136, portrays their successful fight against privatisation.

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A Green Sponge in the City – Nature-Based Solutions Benefitting Urban Planning

By |2020-03-17T09:26:55+01:00March 17th 2020|Climate Change & Resilience, Water & Sanitation, , , |

With cities continuously more threatened by climate change induced disasters, urban planning's reflex response is to protect cities against nature. But what if the solution lies in working with nature instead against it? Architect Kongjiang Yu invites our readers to imagine what cities could look like if they took into account ancient wisdom on spatial planning.

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Urban Settings Need New Approaches

By |2020-06-22T12:40:35+02:00December 12th 2019|Economic Development, Energy & Waste, Urban Health, Water & Sanitation, , , , , , , , , |

The traditional relief-rehabilitation-development paradigm does not hold true in urban conflict zones. A combined approach of long-term support for systems reinforcing short-term support for individuals would meet people’s needs, secure development gains, and represent value for money. The cost of failing to adapt is simply too high, argues Peter Maurer, President of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC).

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How to Make Sure Mexico’s Cities Don’t Run Out of Water

By |2019-09-03T11:32:53+02:00September 3rd 2019|Water & Sanitation, , , , , |

Water is a central issue for urban development in Mexico. Groundwater is overexploited, and there is a lack of wastewater treatment facilities. Jorge Silva reviews government programmes that aim to solve the problem.

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How Can Urban Flood Management in Vietnam Become More Sustainable?

By |2019-05-28T10:10:29+02:00May 28th 2019|Climate Change & Resilience, Water & Sanitation, , , , |

More than one third of Vietnam's population is living in cities, requiring effective sanitation and stormwater services. Yet their provision is limited, with an estimation of less than 10 per cent of wastewater being treated in urban areas. Sebastian Malter argues that a diversification of drainage systems will support sustainable urban development.

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The Forgotten Water – The Role of Decentralised Wastewater Management in Jakarta’s Socio-Ecological System

By |2019-04-02T11:49:29+02:00April 2nd 2019|Water & Sanitation, , , , , , , |

Jakarta has responded to regular flooding by proposing gigantic infrastructure projects such as sea walls to keep the water at bay. But the main problem is that the city does not consider the land-water ecosystem as a whole, says Prathiwi W. Putri.

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Using Forests for Water Treatment: An Example from Rio de Janeiro

By |2019-03-21T10:01:21+01:00March 21st 2019|Basic Infrastructure & Housing, Water & Sanitation, , , , |

Ecosystem loss and degradation contributes to water insecurity worldwide – natural infrastructure strategies that protect and restore natural systems aim to halt and reverse this trend. Suzanne Ozment and Rafael Feltran-Barbieri discuss how water utilities can profit from restoring ecosystems.

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What Hides Behind the Concept of Digital Water?

By |2019-03-19T11:18:50+01:00March 19th 2019|Basic Infrastructure & Housing, Water & Sanitation, , , |

How can digitalisation of urban services increase sustainable urbanisation? What different approaches and innovations already exist and have proven successful? Kala Vairavamoorthy, director of the International Water Association addresses these questions.

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A Place Like Too Many Others: Gender Inequality in Bawana, Delhi

By |2020-06-22T12:24:34+02:00March 8th 2019|Basic Infrastructure & Housing, Water & Sanitation, Youth & Gender, , , , , , , |

In urban settlements around the world, city administrations struggle, and often fail, to provide essential services, safe spaces, and socio-economic securities to residents. While this poses difficulties and dangers to all inhabitants, the consequences of such neglect are especially severe for low-income women and girls.

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The Lagos Water Crisis: Any Role for the Private Sector?

By |2020-04-08T15:27:35+02:00August 28th 2018|Basic Infrastructure & Housing, Governance & Finance, Urban & Metropolitan Governance, Water & Sanitation, , , , , , |

Lagos is suffering from severe water shortage due to profit-oriented politics. Akinbode Oluwafemi points out the conflicts and problems around the privatisation of the water sector and offers alternative solutions for one of the world’s most populous cities.

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Mitigation Through Innovation: Sustainable Water Supply in Windhoek

By |2018-03-22T10:21:51+01:00March 22nd 2018|Urban Nexus, Water & Sanitation, , , , , |

Windhoek—the capital city of Namibia, the most arid country in Sub-Saharan Africa—has long met its severe water challenges through innovation. But its growing population is increasing its demand for water while climate change exacerbates scarce supplies. On the occation of World Water Day 2018, Pierre van Rensburg highlights the city's innovative augmentation strategies to keep the crisis from becoming a catastrophe.

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