Making Cities Safer for Women and Girls, Part II

Kathryn Travers & Margaret Shaw & Kassandra McCleery| March 9th 2017|Categories: CREATING INCLUSIVE CITIES, CREATING LIVEABLE CITIES|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Kathryn Travers & Margaret Shaw & Kassandra McCleery

Kathryn Travers is Executive Director of Women in Cities International (WICI) and works as a global consultant on issues of gender, safety and urban development and governance. She promotes an intersectional approach to broaden the understanding of women’s safety and to explore new related issues like accessibility, essential services, and adolescence. Kathryn has led the development of new and innovative tools for capturing data about women’s and girls’ safety experiences in urban environments and has led training workshops in several countries. She has extensive experience in working with diverse populations in the global North and South.

Margaret Shaw is a sociologist and criminologist working as an independent consultant, and formerly Director of Analysis and Exchange at the International Centre for the Prevention of Crime (ICPC) in Montréal, Canada. She worked as a research and policy advisor in the Home Office, England, and in Canada, at Concordia University, and as a Research Consultant to the federal, provincial, and municipal governments on issues including women’s imprisonment, evaluation, restorative justice, and policing. For UN-Habitat’s Safer Cities Programme, she worked on issues of youth at risk, and youth participation and urban governance.

Kassandra McCleery holds a Master's degree in Urban Planning from McGill University. With a bachelor in International Relations and Diplomacy from Ohio State University, she approaches the challenges of urban development and governance from a global perspective. She has worked with Women and Cities International (WICI) in Montréal, Canada, and carried out a consultation for UN-Habitat’s “Safer Cities” program. Kassandra is especially interested in the intersection of climate change and gender in urban areas. Currently Kassandra is pursuing her planning career in Paris, France.

Latest posts by Kathryn Travers & Margaret Shaw & Kassandra McCleery (see all)

The experiences of women and girls in cities, and their use of the city and its public spaces, are strongly impacted by their gender. Violence and the threat of violence is a pervasive problem that affects communities and cities everywhere. In their two-part contribution, our authors Kathryn Travers, Margaret Shaw, and Kassandra McCleery analyse the gendered realities of urban space and how to make it safer and inclusive for all urban citizens.

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Making Cities Safer for Women and Girls, Part I

Kathryn Travers & Margaret Shaw & Kassandra McCleery| March 8th 2017|Categories: CREATING INCLUSIVE CITIES, CREATING LIVEABLE CITIES|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Kathryn Travers & Margaret Shaw & Kassandra McCleery

Kathryn Travers is Executive Director of Women in Cities International (WICI) and works as a global consultant on issues of gender, safety and urban development and governance. She promotes an intersectional approach to broaden the understanding of women’s safety and to explore new related issues like accessibility, essential services, and adolescence. Kathryn has led the development of new and innovative tools for capturing data about women’s and girls’ safety experiences in urban environments and has led training workshops in several countries. She has extensive experience in working with diverse populations in the global North and South.

Margaret Shaw is a sociologist and criminologist working as an independent consultant, and formerly Director of Analysis and Exchange at the International Centre for the Prevention of Crime (ICPC) in Montréal, Canada. She worked as a research and policy advisor in the Home Office, England, and in Canada, at Concordia University, and as a Research Consultant to the federal, provincial, and municipal governments on issues including women’s imprisonment, evaluation, restorative justice, and policing. For UN-Habitat’s Safer Cities Programme, she worked on issues of youth at risk, and youth participation and urban governance.

Kassandra McCleery holds a Master's degree in Urban Planning from McGill University. With a bachelor in International Relations and Diplomacy from Ohio State University, she approaches the challenges of urban development and governance from a global perspective. She has worked with Women and Cities International (WICI) in Montréal, Canada, and carried out a consultation for UN-Habitat’s “Safer Cities” program. Kassandra is especially interested in the intersection of climate change and gender in urban areas. Currently Kassandra is pursuing her planning career in Paris, France.

Latest posts by Kathryn Travers & Margaret Shaw & Kassandra McCleery (see all)

The experiences of women and girls in cities, and their use of the city and its public spaces, are strongly impacted by their gender. Violence and the threat of violence is a pervasive problem that affects communities and cities everywhere. In their two-part contribution, our authors Kathryn Travers, Margaret Shaw, and Kassandra McCleery analyse the gendered realities of urban space and how to make it safer and inclusive for all urban citizens.

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“Local governments know the reality of their cities” – An Interview with Johana Hernández from the Northern Public Transport Company, Ecuador

URBANET| February 7th 2017|Categories: CREATING LIVEABLE CITIES, SUPPORTING SUSTAINABLE MOBILITY|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Many cities are facing traffic-related problems and are trying to find solutions that take into consideration the local conditions. Sometimes, these solutions clash with problem solving approaches by central governments. In her interview with URBANET, Johana Hernández from the Northern Public Transport Company in Ecuador talks about such challenges and her visions for inclusive mobility.

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The challenge of changing travel behaviours

Roger Behrens| December 20th 2016|Categories: RESOURCE MANAGEMENT & ENERGY EFFICIENCY, SUPPORTING SUSTAINABLE MOBILITY|Tags: , , , , , , |

Roger Behrens

Roger Behrens

Associate Professor at University of Cape Town
Roger Behrens is an Associate Professor in the University of Cape Town’s Department of Civil Engineering. He is Director of the Centre for Transport Studies, and of the African Centre of Excellence for Studies in Public and Non-motorised Transport. He graduated with a Master Degree in City and Regional Planning from UCT in 1991, and with a PhD degree in 2002.
Roger Behrens

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Urban travel requirements are constantly changing, and so are the challenges that cities face in keeping their inhabitants mobile. In an interview with URBANET, Roger Behrens (University of Cape Town) talks about the importance of accessibility, the challenges for local governments and the changing travel dynamics in South Africa.

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Live from Quito, Day 1: The official opening of Habitat III

URBANET| October 18th 2016|Categories: HABITAT III & NEW URBAN AGENDA|Tags: , , , , , |

Habitat III, the long-awaited global conference on urbanisation, was officially opened on Monday morning. Read URBANET's report on the first day of the conference!

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Transforming transport: A new initiative for sustainable urban mobility was launched in Quito

URBANET| October 18th 2016|Categories: HABITAT III & NEW URBAN AGENDA|Tags: , , , , , , , |

At Habitat III, the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) presented a new initiative to tackle the dire need for worldwide sustainable urban mobility solutions. With the “Transformative Urban Mobility Initiative (TUMI)”, the Ministry and its partners are planning to support cities on their route to make accessible, sustainable transport available to their citizens.

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Towards a Global Transition in Urban Transport Concepts

URBANET| October 14th 2016|Categories: CREATING LIVEABLE CITIES, SUPPORTING SUSTAINABLE MOBILITY|Tags: , , , , , , |

Rapid urbanisation comes with growing volumes of traffic and air pollution, which creates an urgent need for sustainable and integrated urban mobility solutions. To find such solutions is one of the key goals that the German Development Cooperation wants to achieve in the Habitat III process. A newly published brochure lays out the ideas of how to get there.

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Yuriy bikes to work. How sustainable mobility in Ukraine contributes to climate protection

Mathias Merforth| October 13th 2016|Categories: CREATING LIVEABLE CITIES, SUPPORTING SUSTAINABLE MOBILITY|Tags: , , , , , , , |

Mathias Merforth

Mathias Merforth

Transport Policy Advisor at GIZ Transport & Mobility
Mathias Merforth is a transport economist and has been working for GIZ Transport & Mobility since 2013. Specifically, he is involved in the capacity building program “Sustainable Urban Transport Project (GIZ-SUTP)”, the German Partnership for Sustainable Mobility (GPSM) and the Transformative Urban Mobility Initiative (TUMI). In his work, he focuses on urban mobility planning, integrated transport systems and financing sustainable transport. He is the co-author and manager of various studies and publications of SUTP and GPSM, and supports dialogue formats for international cooperation in mobility & logistics.
Mathias Merforth

If cities are to live up to their responsibility to protect the climate, they need to invest in sustainable mobility. How Ukrainian-German cooperation is already successfully tackling the challenge of supporting CO2-neutral traffic, you can read about here!

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Proximity City – improving access, avoiding transport

Cornie Huizenga & Mark Major| October 12th 2016|Categories: CREATING LIVEABLE CITIES, SUPPORTING SUSTAINABLE MOBILITY|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Cornie Huizenga & Mark Major

Cornie Huizenga & Mark Major

Secretary General & Senior Advisor at Partnership on Sustainable, Low Carbon Transport (SLoCaT)
Cornie Huizenga is the Secretary General of the Partnership on Sustainable, Low Carbon Transport (SLoCaT), the largest multi-stakeholder partnership working on sustainable transport. The SLoCaT Partnership plays a lead role in the integration of sustainable, low-carbon transport in global policies on sustainable development and climate change, especially the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement on Climate Change.

Mark Major is a Senior Advisor to the Partnership on Sustainable, Low Carbon Transport (SLoCaT). His focus is on the global sustainable development processes and the developing “action agendas” resulting from the Paris Agreement on Climate Change and Habitat III. He is also a Visiting Professor at the Chinese Academy of Transport Science (Ministry of Transport) in Beijing. Previously, he was the Team Leader for Sustainable Urban Mobility for the European Commission.
Cornie Huizenga & Mark Major

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Urban transport systems are already under pressure with growing congestion in most urban areas. Given the rising demand for transport per person and the urgent need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, we need a rapid transformation in urban mobility patterns and modes, argue our authors Cornie Huizenga and Mark Major of SLoCaT.

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Cycling in Bogotá and electric buses in Mexico City: CFF announces pilot projects

Aris Moro| September 8th 2016|Categories: CREATING LIVEABLE CITIES, STRENGTHENING CITIES AS ACTORS, STRENGTHENING FINANCING, SUPPORTING SUSTAINABLE MOBILITY|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Aris Moro

Aris Moro

Aris Moro serves as a Project Officer for the Cities Finance Facility at C40. Previously, Moro worked at C40 as a research assistant to the Executive Director and as a content coordinator for the C40 Cities Awards at COP21 in Paris. Prior to joining C40, Moro worked for Carbon Analytics, an environmental accounting start-up, and for ABC Trust, an Anglo-Brazilian NGO helping children in vulnerable urban environments.
Moro holds a MSc in Environmental Policy and Regulation from LSE and a BA in Philosophy, Politics and Economics from the University of York and the University of California, San Diego.
Aris Moro

C40 Cities Finance Facility (CFF) have announced their first pilot projects for low-carbon, resilient transportation in megacities. Bogotá and Mexiko City will be implementing new bicycle roads and electric bus services.

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